Talents, strengths, resources, knowledge, and skills, can help you get where you want to go in life–but those things alone won’t do it. You also need to work hard to be truly successful.  A powerful work ethic leads to a culture of success.

 

What Can Teachers Do to Encourage a Student Work Ethic?

  1. Hold Teacher-Parent Conversations
  2. Create a Parent Newsletter
  3. Develop a Parent Network
  4. Organize a Parent-Student Forum

(Guest Writer: Tim Elmore)  I celebrate it whenever I meet hard-working students. I see them on almost every university campus I’m on, and in almost every high school I visit. These adolescents just “get the system” and realize you can achieve almost anything if you work hard enough. On the other hand, I also see far too many students growing up in a world of speed and convenience who’ve never developed a work ethic.

May I suggest a couple of reasons why this might be?

From a recent survey of parents, 82 percent said “doing chores” was a normal household experience for them growing up. However, only 28 percent of these same parents say they ask their kids to do chores. For some reason, it was good for us, but not good for them. We feel we’re not good parents if we stress them out with chores.  Continue reading

About the author: CTA IFT
The CTA Institute for Teaching promotes Strength-Based Teacher Driven Change. Through grants, member engagement, special programs, research, conferences, networking, and community-based coalitions, the CTA Institute for Teaching seeks to advance public education and promote the common good of our students and communities.